Category: Alternative

Slipping Into Fiction

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Chapter 9: Uneasy Familiarity Chapter Investigating Murder Chapter The Cure for Boredom Chapter Dreading the Worst Chapter Have We Met Before? Chapter Suspicious Admirers Chapter Dark Past, Uncertain Future Chapter Asking for Favors Chapter Honor, Interests, Respect Chapter Watching from the Dark Chapter One and the Same Chapter Kissing Death Chapter Two in the Night Chapter The Spark of Attraction Chapter The Stain of Chaos Chapter Inviting Darkness From enhanced athletes to bored ghosts, these stories display Lauren's spec-fic interests.

There are also a few essays at the end of the collection, one of which explains the personal inspiration behind The Shining Girls; an essay well worth reading. I met Lauren at a writers' festival wh Could zombies be a viable replacement for slave labour? I met Lauren at a writers' festival where she was running a workshop on, surprise surprise, writing.

I really enjoyed reading the aforementioned The Shining Girls as it was a highly enjoyable mix of crime and spec-fic. So I was looking forward to reading this collection. As with any collection of previously published works, there are highs and lows.

For me the highs outweighed the lows, with Slipping, The Green, and Ghost Girl being amongst my favourites. I think the strengths of this collection come from the South African cultural influence to Lauren's writing, which gives far more grittiness to the bleak sci-fi stories than you usually see.

If you're a spec-fic fan, or a fan of Lauren's writing - and how could you not be? I received a digital copy of this book from the publisher, through Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review. Nov 17, Seyi Onabanjo rated it liked it. These are mine Enjoy them all Aug 18, Amy rated it really liked it. I first discovered Lauren Beukes after picking up a copy of Broken Monsters and immediately became smitten. This is a talent I haven't found in other authors and it ma I first discovered Lauren Beukes after picking up a copy of Broken Monsters and immediately became smitten.

This is a talent I haven't found in other authors and it makes me feel like I've found a true treasure in Beukes' novels. My love of Broken Monsters and The Shining Girls has yet to waiver so when I saw that Beuekes had released a collection of short stories and essays, I think my heart stopped momentarily.

While some stories are particularly heavy on the science fiction "Unathi Battles the Black Hairballs" and "The Green" others like "Smileys" and "My Insect Skin" are made all the more chilling by their realism. While each story in this collection is unique, they all have that one piece in common that make me so passionate about her previous novels - there's a sense of some underlying real world threat in even the most intensely science fiction story lines.

Much like Margaret Atwood 's The Handmaid's Tale , the reader is left with feelings of unease, that though what you've just read is fiction, it still hits too close to home to not make you nervous.

Slipping ends with a brief collection of non-fiction that helped to make her fiction even more meaningful. I felt that this glimpse in Beukes' own life and personal experiences made her fiction even more meaningful.

Thank you, Netgalley and Tachyon Publications, for providing me the opportunity to further my Lauren Beukes obsession! Aug 17, Jared added it. I had quite a time getting my hands on this book! Was it worth it?

I'm honestly not sure. Is this book worth it? I think so, but as always, I have Some Thoughts. First I want to say that Lauren Beukes is a new favorite author of mine. I loved Zoo City , and the Shining Girls put me in that fan-category of instantly pre-ordering anything she wrote from then on.

Broken Monsters is similarly good, but I kind of prefer the Shining Girls for its specific focus on violence against women.

Second, a story I had quite a time getting my hands on this book! Second, a story of my own on the general weirdness of actually acquiring this book spoilered for your convenience view spoiler [I pre-ordered the Kindle edition of Slipping , and Amazon ran me through a bit of a loop. I received an email telling me the release date had been pushed back next Tuesday.

Then another email, another Tuesday. Then a third email--my preorder had been canceled. I couldn't find a good reason for this, especially given that I didn't find the email until searching for it of my own volition, consulting a mental calendar and thinking, I don't remember it being delayed this long.

It has to be out by now, right? And it was! It had released--on schedule. I was baffled and a little annoyed, and by that point I didn't really want to read the book. There's Slipping on the new release shelf, so: cool! Next week's plan is set. I come back and it's gone. It's not in-section with the Beukes fiction, it's not in fiction anthologies. I ask at the desk, figuring maybe it's been checked out by another right-thinking Beukes fan.

No dice, it's simply missing. But he puts in the hold anyway. I get the email saying it's ready the next day, so someone got a hold of it, and here we are, nearly eight months later. Slipping actually contains 21 short stories some of them flash or micro-fiction and five pieces of nonfiction. Twitter genre mashup fiction, sci-fi, dark fantasy, all variations of crime and thriller, and some shorter, more experimental pieces show the range of her voice and skill. Rereading it, I was reminded a bit of S.

Diva 's Runtime ; both are excellent. Like a hit of cyberpunk, sharp and intense but with little beyond the initial high. Otherwise, I thought, very interesting. Good worldbuilding; that is to say, introducing me to sociocultural dynamics that are very South African and may have gone over my head, but were not inaccessible to me, an ignorant North American.

Fans of Beukes' work in "Fairest" will enjoy this one. One of my favorite stories in the collection. The visceral shock pulled off the end alone makes it stand out. But I just could not get into this one. Seems like a universal truth that for every story collection, there is one story that irrationally refuses to be enjoyed. This was that story for me. Fun, but I don't remember what specifically I enjoyed about this one.

Leads to some interesting formatting tricks, to varying effects. Do I dislike it, or just what it might portend? Had to reread parts of this one.

But I felt bad for the sentient sound system. Solid emotional arc and ending. Personally, I found that I liked the story the more story there was. These stories, I think, gave their characters and setting room to breathe. The major exception being "The Green," which for some reason just completely bounced off me.

Some of the shorter stories, I notice, are the ones that seem to be more locally populated: about, or set in, Johannesburg, Cape Town, or somewhere near there. So "Parking", "Easy Touch", "Smileys", "Exhibitionist" -- These felt very Beukes to me, but did not feel like the most fleshed out stories.

But, you know, they don't all have to be. For all I disliked a particular story, just about each one in this collection does what it sets out to do, and with a clear voice. I did find a lot to like, and enjoyed reading it. The shorter or more atypical stories didn't work for me, but that's true of, say, That Book Your Mad Ancestor Wrote as well. I can only fault myself for not being wowed by the selection: I'd read the title story, "Slipping," in the Twelve Tomorrows collection where it was first released, and two of the most resonant essays "All the Pretty Corpses","Inner City" I had either heard or read Beukes discuss in interviews I'd tracked down before.

All this to say, I was a big fan of Beukes before, and I still am. This, like William Gibson's Distrust That Particular Flavor , like probably any collection by a favorite author, is going to be worth how much you can't get enough of that person's creative output. Nov 13, Eddie Generous rated it it was amazing. Unnerving Magazine Review Distinctly Lauren Beukes, Slipping is a collection that ranges from the far reaches of otherworldly science fiction to straight literary and off toward a world mashed of fixtures between the two.

Mostly dark and often grim, this is a full-bodied experience of the vast talents. Crisp writing and concise plots rein the stories leaning toward muted disaster. Beukes touches on many subjects familiar to her longer stories, but does so with flash bolts that seem to glimmer and Unnerving Magazine Review Distinctly Lauren Beukes, Slipping is a collection that ranges from the far reaches of otherworldly science fiction to straight literary and off toward a world mashed of fixtures between the two.

Beukes touches on many subjects familiar to her longer stories, but does so with flash bolts that seem to glimmer and convey the message that she is fully deserving of the attention of the reader. She adapts such a variety of voices and vices that it is difficult to explain as singular piece. Dread, action, sexuality, unsexing, fables, skillfully quiet terror, humanities valued and weighed —stories woven together smoother than should be likely given the variety in artistic expulsion.

South African roots rope around the majority of these tales and offer a view into a world not readily available to the North American public. Vivid and colorful, these scenes and stories carry a valuable weight and strength. Eventually, the fiction ceases and the non-fiction slides in, belonging and befitting. Often the changeover can feel stark or abrasive, off-putting often conveying too much moral or expectations from the reader.

Slipping is a powerhouse of rich, demanding and surprising short works. Nov 18, Katharine Ventureadlaxre rated it it was amazing Shelves: review. This is, as the by-line says, a collection of stories, essays and other writing such as poems. We start off with a poem titled Muse, about fishhooks in the fingers of gloves that embed themselves a little more with every keystroke, and it's beautiful.

From there we have the first short story, about a girl who, instead of the lower half of her legs, has neurocircuitry. She's come to Pakistan as one of the runners as the taxi driver oh so cleverly works out , in a futuristic version of the Paral This is, as the by-line says, a collection of stories, essays and other writing such as poems.

She's come to Pakistan as one of the runners as the taxi driver oh so cleverly works out , in a futuristic version of the Paralympics. It's hard hitting and interesting, character-driven like Beukes does best, and the perfect start to the collection.

Each part in the collection after this is totally different, and yet utterly enthralling and manages to keep you reading though the easy way you slip into each narrative. Usually when there's huge changes in short story to short story I usually need a break, but this collection works perfectly at holding you down to devour the first half easily within an hour - or until dinner interrupts you, at least.

Being Beukes, hard topics are described and explored, and being Beukes one can easily trust in the author to be both sensitive, intelligent and eloquent throughout. The non-fiction shows us work that Beukes did as a journalist, and it's amazingly good - I'm picky with my non-fiction and either struggle through each paragraph or can't put it down, and this was the latter. In this collection, though it's sometimes hard to see through the grit and the grime and the grim nature of the narrative, there is still hope and determination and people ready to struggle for what's right.

And that's what makes this collection so damn powerful. The majority are fiction, with five nonfiction essays at the end of the collection.

As with any compilation, some of the works appealed to me and felt more successful than others, but there is no selected work included that doesn't belong.

There are several selections that could easily be the start of a novel. My absolute top favorites were Slipping, Smileys, The Green, and Litmash, but there are several others I also liked quite a bit.

All the works are, to some extent, about the darkness inside people's souls. They are all well-written and powerful. Sep 22, Scrapsandsass rated it really liked it. Lauren Beukes continues her string of knock-them-out-of-the-park hits with Slipping. Beukes' creativity explodes with so many interesting story concepts within the pages of this book. Characters and situations that haunt you long after you finish. It is definitely a must-read. Nov 16, Becky Spratford rated it liked it.

Readers also enjoyed. Short Stories. Science Fiction. About Lauren Beukes. Lauren Beukes. Lauren Beukes is an award-winning, best-selling novelist who also writes screenplays, TV shows, comics and journalism. Her books have been translated into 26 languages and have been optioned for film and TV. She is the author of Broken Monsters, about art, ambition, damaged people and not-quite-broken cities, The Shining Girls, about a time-travelling serial killer, the nature of violence, and how we are haunted by history, Zoo City, a phantasmagorical noir set in Johannesburg which won the Arthur C Clarke Award and Moxyland, a dystopian political thriller about a corporate apartheid state where people are controlled by their cell phones.

She lives in Cape Town, South Africa with her daughter. My sorrow shrouds me. I grasp in the darkness for happiness. Each time filled with enthusiasm over my catch. Each time disappointed once the moment is over. I have been reduced to the window of my own soul. Trapped between my true potential and my downfalls. Seeking an answer to a quiet prayer. Learning patience while I watch the clock slowly tick by.

Watching the scenery on the calender change from fall to spring to summer. The smile on my face betrays them. Confused when I share my innermost thoughts. The unseen battle of evil presses on.

Gnawing at my bones. Shredding at my muscles. Shards of my existence remain but I'm not sure for how long. Nothing can assuage the sorrow. There is no sunshine. For now I live in the dark. Waiting, hoping, praying for the sun again. This moment Posted on AM - by slipping. Our innocent dancing began to turn into foreplay.

I rubbed on him with the intentions to incite him. Grinding my hips into his pelvis looking to grab his attention. I could feel it working as his hands traveled from the small of my back towards my rib cage as I momentarily bent over in correlation with the words of the song.

As I came up his hands were now under my shirt, grasping my breast. At this point all common sense escaped me. The fact that this was my ex. The fact that he was in love with someone else now was insignificant in this moment. In this moment - it was me and him. Our bodies, the music, the sweat that dripped from my hair.

In this moment it was us again - without the arguments, without the stresses that created the tiny fissures that contributed to the decline of our relationship. In this moment his hands were under my soaked shirt, my hand now firmly on his dick. The alcohol slowed the moment down. The music created the pulse for our bodies.

The memories of our naked bodies pressed together becoming more vivid. His dad mutters something about quantum physics and parallel universes, so Albie gets a cardboard box, a laptop and a banana and sends himself to parallel worlds in search of his mum. The parallel world that Alice enters in these two books is a much stranger world than our own, populated by peculiar creatures with a fondness for wordplay and grinning cats — so not too different from Twitter really.

In Narnia, CS Lewis created a parallel world of unparalleled imagination. From one of the touchstone authors of my Mancunian childhood comes this haunting story of four Mancunian children who discover a portal to the fantasy world of Elidor inside a derelict church.

There they have to find four treasures and bring these back to their own world to keep them safe. But the portals between parallel worlds can run both ways, and the evil forces that lurk in Elidor follow them back to Manchester In her Chrestomanci books, Diana Wynne Jones weaves magic and parallel universes to create a spellbinding series.

The Lives of Christopher Chant tells how the hero of the title can travel to these parallel worlds in his dreams.

She asked for these elements to be included: Greg and Nick working a case, the boys flirting (without knowing they both like each other), Greg slipping because it's raining and kind of pulling Nick down with him. It's a 7, word story told in 3 scenes. I hope she and anyone else who reads it enjoys it. Thanks! Slipping into Love By: Ms Maggs.

8 Replies to “Slipping Into Fiction”

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  2. Steve Stevens Slipping Into Fiction lyrics & video: Bad news on her doorstep She doesn't need to lie, she doesn't need her conscience Misused by her bad, bad mess It's time to.
  3. Dec 11,  · Knocking to Aunties front door sees Aunty lightly skipping breathlessly downstairs to admit her gorgeous girl. On stepping into the large hall and giving her girl a long welcoming kiss and slow hug (Aunty is very pleased to feel her girls hands already smoothing into the satins of Aunty's blouse and slip), Aunty Chats away to her adoring girl.
  4. Together, they turn him into the complete sissy! 4 Pam. By Pamela TV. A story of intense bondage and sissy training. A man is forced into tight corsets and other controlling garments and forced to serve along side a female slave. Two Mistresses direct the action, forcing these slaves into every humiliating predicament imaginable!!
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  6. She asked for these elements to be included: Greg and Nick working a case, the boys flirting (without knowing they both like each other), Greg slipping because it's raining and kind of pulling Nick down with him. It's a 7, word story told in 3 scenes. I hope she and anyone else who reads it enjoys it. Thanks! Slipping into Love By: Ms Maggs.
  7. Mar 28,  · Slipping into Gear: A Female Librarian to Biker Chick Magic Transformation Story - Kindle edition by Tang, Richard. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Slipping into Gear: A Female Librarian to Biker Chick Magic Transformation halfcelltitegodfeperarinlelasag.xyzinfo: Richard Tang.
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